Direct and second-hand tobacco smoke both linked to premature menopause, report reveals < Go Back

The BBC News report reads: “Women who are heavy or habitual smokers are more likely to experience the menopause earlier [before the age of 50], a study suggests,” which also cited in the same study that there is a weaker link for women exposed to second-hand smoke.

A woman smoking her last cigarette before switching to an e cig starter kit

Experts involved in the research studied information from in excess of 93,000 women via a significant US study.

The study was carried out by researchers from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the School of Public Health and Health Professions, the University of Pittsburgh, Harvard Medical School and the University of New York, and was funded by the US National Institutes of Health.

The results found that women who smoked traditional cigarettes were more likely to have had difficulties falling pregnant, and, on average, reached menopause between one and two years prior to women who had never smoked or regularly been in contact with second-hand smoke.

Smoking has already been linked to fertility problems and earlier menopause because of the effect tobacco toxins have on the reproductive system and hormone levels.

While the fresh research is unable to offer concrete evidence that cigarette smoke actually caused these problems, there is certainly no denying that cigarette smoke – either from smoking or passive smoking – plays a factor when it comes to women’s fertility. This is alongside a multitude of other known adverse health effects: one more reason, if you really needed one, to kick the habit, with the help of an e cig starter kit, perhaps?

 

Image: Adam Charmness under Creative Commons